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marvelentertainment:

Oh, yeah! Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy” is in theaters everywhere August 1. Get your tickets

marvelentertainment:

Oh, yeah! Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy” is in theaters everywhere August 1. Get your tickets

stormtrooperfashion:

Liu Wen in “Mixed Media” by Mikael Jansson for Vogue, August 2014

stormtrooperfashion:

Liu Wen in “Mixed Media” by Mikael Jansson for Vogue, August 2014

dreammason:

Edward Steichen, Vogue 1925

dreammason:

Edward Steichen, Vogue 1925

stormtrooperfashion:

Miranda Kerr, Ava Smith and Lindsey Wixson by Mario Testino for the Ochirly Fall 2014/Winter 2015 Campaign

stormtrooperfashion:

Luisa Bianchin by Paul Morel for ELLE Mexico, July 2014
See more from this set here.

stormtrooperfashion:

Luisa Bianchin by Paul Morel for ELLE Mexico, July 2014

See more from this set here.

stormtrooperfashion:

Malgosia Bela in “The Development of Form” by Luigi & Daniele + Iango for Vogue Japan, September 2014
See more from this set here.

stormtrooperfashion:

Malgosia Bela in “The Development of Form” by Luigi & Daniele + Iango for Vogue Japan, September 2014

See more from this set here.

hazor:

Régine on her way to stage 2 on It’s Never Over (Hey Orpheus)
Hyde Park, British summer time festival, July 3rd, 2014.

bpod-mrc:

28 July 2014
Blocking Malaria
Plasmodium falciparum – one of the five Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria – spend the majority of their lives in human red blood cells (where they are seen pictured here in green/purple). During this time, they produce over 450 proteins, allowing them to rebuild the surface of the host cell and avoid being discovered by our immune cells. These proteins also help the parasites take in nutrients and increase their virulence. But transporting these building blocks within the host cell relies on an enzyme called plasmepsin V (PMV) and now researchers have developed a compound called WEHI-916, which prevents PMV from working properly. As soon as PMV is no longer active, the malaria parasites die. As PMV is such an important enzyme, targeting it with antimalarial drugs could prevent infections from the outset, by stopping the development and release of Plasmodium ’s crucial proteins.
Written by Katie Panteli
—
Image by Eric Hanssen and Megan Dearnley courtesy of Cell Picture ShowUniversity of Melbourne, AustraliaCopyright Elsevier 2014Research published in PLOS Biology, July 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

28 July 2014

Blocking Malaria

Plasmodium falciparum – one of the five Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria – spend the majority of their lives in human red blood cells (where they are seen pictured here in green/purple). During this time, they produce over 450 proteins, allowing them to rebuild the surface of the host cell and avoid being discovered by our immune cells. These proteins also help the parasites take in nutrients and increase their virulence. But transporting these building blocks within the host cell relies on an enzyme called plasmepsin V (PMV) and now researchers have developed a compound called WEHI-916, which prevents PMV from working properly. As soon as PMV is no longer active, the malaria parasites die. As PMV is such an important enzyme, targeting it with antimalarial drugs could prevent infections from the outset, by stopping the development and release of Plasmodium ’s crucial proteins.

Written by Katie Panteli

Image by Eric Hanssen and Megan Dearnley courtesy of Cell Picture Show
University of Melbourne, Australia
Copyright Elsevier 2014
Research published in PLOS Biology, July 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bluecaptions:

Burn.

(Source: reddit.com)

stormtrooperfashion:

Rosie Huntington Whiteley by Daniel Jackson for the Prabal Gurung Fall 2014/Winter 2015 Campaign

stormtrooperfashion:

Rosie Huntington Whiteley by Daniel Jackson for the Prabal Gurung Fall 2014/Winter 2015 Campaign